Sunday, 10 November 2013

SCIENCE


Photo via TIME.

So, good morning, if you're reading this you probably weren't crushed by a satellite this Sunday morning. Congratulations! Although, there is still a satellite descending to Earth. "It’s called GOCE (GO-chay), for Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Observer . . . and it’s currently only 105 mi. (169 km) up and descending fast. The satellite, launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency, makes a single orbit of the Earth once every 88 minutes—an important two minutes faster than the standard 90 minutes most spacecraft take. The reason for all this crash-and-burn is that orbits aren’t forever.No, really.  Read full article in TIME.


Photo: The Procrastinator (some) Times.

"In the popular imagination voice-hearing is often viewed with fear and suspicion, frequently reified as a chaotic, corrupted symptom of illness. But that is changing, with a growing acceptance of voice-hearing as a profoundly human experience that can no longer be reduced to a mere symptom of psychiatric disorder. The work of Intervoice: The International Hearing Voices Network, and the enthusiastic response to Eleanor Longden's 2013 TED talk, which recounts her own journey to recovery from a demoralising psychiatric diagnosis, indicate the growing possibilities for people living with the experience to raise their voices with a sense of power and pride." And this is why Charles Fernyhough a

No comments:

Post a Comment